No one else knows what it takes for another person to open the door. -Pema Chödrön

Door

I like neatness:   orderly stacks of papers, books aligned properly on shelves, forks and knives all going in the same direction in the silverware drawer.  It’s not surprising that I find it difficult to accept that aphasia therapy is a bit messy.  It is not linear, this journey from beginning to middle to end.  And my role keeps shifting, or should anyway, depending on whom the person with aphasia wants me to be.  I am not exceedingly patient.  Sometimes, I see the door opening, and want to push through to the other side.  I find it hard to follow, rather than lead, but enough doors have been slammed in my face, so that I am learning to wait, and to let things happen rather than convince myself it is my job to make them happen.  As if I could.  The thing of it is, once through the door, there is another.

And another.  And another….

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About Shirley Morganstein

I am a life participation therapist for people with aphasia, exploring the relational and reflective process.
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One Response to No one else knows what it takes for another person to open the door. -Pema Chödrön

  1. Mebiel says:

    Doing intensive tx in PIRATE was a lesson in patience for me. You don’t want to change treatment course in a program like this (unless your building on a change in the client’s performance). So, you wait and wait (and pray that you didn’t form a wrong treatment plan). Over and over again I was in a position where I felt I had to abandon what I was doing when, all of a sudden, the client would have a burst of improvement (followed by another dry period). This cycle happened so often that I finally learned to wait and let things unfold on their own. Not sure yet how I will take this experience and translate it into typical outpatient treatment once I start seeing clients again.

    Like

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