Monthly Archives: November 2010

Mindfulness and the SLP: Guest post from Marilyn Certner Smith

Mindfulness and the SLP What is most important in the therapy relationship? Is it the careful application of treatment, providing feedback, imparting knowledge, connecting in a very personal and meaningful way, or, is it all of the above and not n… Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

"When hope is not pinned wriggling onto a shiny image or expectation, it sometimes floats forth and opens.” Anne Lamott

I have been told a lot about hope – warnings not to take it away, or give it if it is “false;” losing it, finding it, opening doors to it, searching for it, hope dashed, gone, dead. A person with aphasia rarely talks about hope in the early days o… Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

I love what you’ve done with your hair."

ASHA 2010 had several presentations by people who suddenly found themselves on the other side of the table, so to speak: speech-language pathologists who themselves were suddenly faced with what it was like to live with aphasia or cognitive impair… Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

I’m not an Itsa.

Back from the ASHA 2010 convention with a lot to think about. Let’s begin here. When I was a student with Hildred Schuell at the Minneapolis VA, I would watch her, and her disciple, Joyce Sefer, working on stimulation therapy. The person with apha… Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

The first duty of love is to listen. –Paul Tillich

When I was in graduate school at the University of Minnesota, I had the good fortune of meeting Dr. Jerry Siegel. Jerry, it turns out, grew up in Brooklyn, not far from the paint store that belonged to my cousins’ family. Thus, we were related. Fe… Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

No one else knows what it takes for another person to open the door. -Pema Chödrön

I like neatness: orderly stacks of papers, books aligned properly on shelves, forks and knives all going in the same direction in the silverware drawer. It’s not surprising that I find it difficult to accept that aphasia therapy is a bit messy. It… Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment